VITAC Featured in Hollywood Reporter on the Business of Captioning

Jul 10 2023 VITAC
A close-up photo of a stack of nine magazines, stacked on top of each other, with only the edges showing. For the Hollywood Reporter blog.
Filters

Popular posts

Cell phone laying on a desk near a computer keyboard with the Twitch logo displayed on the phone screen
How to Add Captions to Twitch How to Add Captions to Twitch
lamp on desk
So You Want to Be a VITAC Realtime Captioner… So You Want to Be a VITAC Realtime Captioner…

Related posts

VITAC, a Verbit Company logo, on a television screen. The screen is atop a white cabinet against a white wall backdrop.
VITAC and ENCO Form Strategic Partnership to Expand Caption Encoding and Delivery Options for Broadcasters VITAC and ENCO Form Strategic Partnership to Expand Caption Encoding and Delivery Options for Broadcasters
A girl sitting on the couch with tv remote pointed at the tv screen that has picture of tree branches and open captions
VITAC Combines AI Technology, Experience to Deliver Exceptional Caption and Transcription Quality  VITAC Combines AI Technology, Experience to Deliver Exceptional Caption and Transcription Quality 
Share
Copied!

VITAC’s Heather York is quoted in a recent article in The Hollywood Reporter regarding the business around captions and subtitles and how the media and entertainment industry has changed as the number of streaming programs and caption and subtitle viewers continues to grow.

The article notes that younger viewers’ (Gen Z) affinity for watching captioned content combined with the increasingly global nature of streaming has created more demand for professional captioners and transcribers.

From the article:

“While closed captioning was once a niche service used mostly by hard-of-hearing viewers, subtitles have seen an explosion in the streaming age; deaf-led charity Stagetext found in a 2021 survey that 80 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds use subtitles some or all of the time when watching TV on any device, and only 10 percent of those surveyed were deaf or hard of hearing. It also found that only 23 percent of those in the 56-75 age group use captions, despite a higher rate of hearing loss.

This cultural shift has coincided with there being more to watch than ever before, particularly with content that is streamed around the world rather than just broadcast in the U.S. That’s created a massive task for the companies behind film and TV captioning.

‘Everything has changed in the past 10 years,’ says Heather York, VP marketing and government affairs for VITAC, the largest captioning company in North America.”

Read the full article here.