VITAC’s Multi-Language Dubbing Can Help Your YouTube Content Speak to All Audiences

Feb 28 2023 VITAC
Close up on YouTube on a desktop computer, showing the menu bar on the left of the screen.
Filters

Popular posts

Cell phone laying on a desk near a computer keyboard with the Twitch logo displayed on the phone screen
How to Add Captions to Twitch How to Add Captions to Twitch
lamp on desk
So You Want to Be a VITAC Realtime Captioner… So You Want to Be a VITAC Realtime Captioner…

Related posts

Exterior photo of the department of justice (DOJ) building with an American flag flying in front.
Justice Department Sets Accessibility Requirements for State and Local Government Websites and Mobile Apps Justice Department Sets Accessibility Requirements for State and Local Government Websites and Mobile Apps
VITAC, a Verbit Company logo, on a television screen. The screen is atop a white cabinet against a white wall backdrop.
VITAC and ENCO Form Strategic Partnership to Expand Caption Encoding and Delivery Options for Broadcasters VITAC and ENCO Form Strategic Partnership to Expand Caption Encoding and Delivery Options for Broadcasters
Share
Copied!

YouTube is rolling out support for multi-language audio tracks, enabling creators to add dubbing to their new and existing videos and helping content reach wider, international audiences.

Previously, creators who wanted to include multi-language dubbing on their videos would need to create a new, separate video (or video channel, in many cases) for each language they featured. The new multi-language audio track option means that viewers will be able to select a different audio track from the same menu where they adjust other settings, like subtitles or audio quality.

Creators can add different audio tracks through YouTube’s Subtitles Editor tool. Viewers will need to click the video’s settings (like you would to enable closed captions) to see what audio tracks are available to start watching in another language. Content, the company says, will default to match the viewer’s preferred language, and users will be able to search for multilingual content thanks to translated video titles and descriptions.

In early tests with creators, the feature has been used on more than 3,500 videos uploaded in over 40 languages. YouTube reports that creators testing multi-language dubbed videos saw more than 15 percent of their watch time coming from views in the video’s non-primary language. YouTube also said that, in January alone, viewers watched more than 2 million hours of dubbed video daily.

Though the technology to support the multi-language offering was built in-house at YouTube, creators will need to work with a third-party provider, like VITAC and sister company, Take 1, to create their dubbed audio tracks.

VITAC and Take 1 offer a wide range of English and multi-language dubbing and localization services that live up to the original production.

Clients choose our voice dubbing service because of our attention to detail. We employ talented voice actors working in modern studios, and use cutting edge audio equipment to create a new audio track with perfect lip-synch. The dubbed track captures the emotions, tone, and any idiomatic expressions of the original audio content, and can include multiple voice actors, song interpretations and adaptations, and music and effects reconstructions.

Check out how we worked with Hyper Studios, a media and entertainment company that operates five YouTube channels primarily focused on Roblox gaming and real-life content such as challenges and comedic skits, to help them reach more viewers.

Interested in learning how we can make your YouTube videos speak to all audiences? Contact us today and one of our experts will walk you through the process.